CBRN Gas Mask Filter NBC-77 SOF 40mm Thread

Product Description

The NBC-77 SOF 40mm gas mask filter canister, in combination with a full-face mask, mouthpiece assembly, or PAPR, reliably protects air passages against a wide range of harmful and highly toxic substances including all known CBRN agents.

The filters are produced with standard round threads according to STANAG 4155 (EN 148- 1)- Rd 40x1/7". The filter components are made of hard plastic. This results in a very robust product that is extremely durable against shock and impact damage in operational use.

  • Unmatched 20 year shelf life for cost-saving, long term storage
  • Compatible with commonly available 40mm NATO threaded respirators for interchangeability
  • Protects against a wide variety of known toxic CBRN agents, including radioactive iodine

NBC-77 SOF GAS MASK FILTER KEY FEATURES:

  • Compatible with standard 40mm NATO threaded respirators, which are widely available.
  • 20-year shelf life - save money long-term by not having to replace your filters every 5 years
  • Used by military personnel, CBRN specialists, and special operations forces all over the world
  • Filter all known CBRN agents, including radioactive iodine, rated for A2B2E2K2HgSXP3 D R.
  • Certified by European agencies and has the “CE” symbol. Compliant under EN 14387:2004 + A1:2008

NBC-77 SOF GAS MASK FILTER APPLICATION:

The filter canister in connection with a suitable respirator or PAPR provides protection against solid and liquid particles, pepper spray (OC), smoke-producing substances, radioactive particles, bacteria and rickettsia, fungi, toxins, viruses, riot control agents (lachrymators, sternutators, vomiting agents), blister agents (vesicants), choking agents, blood agents, nerve agents, incapacitants, herbicides, pesticides, and TIC, such as bromoacetone, CS, CR, CN, CNC, CNS, CA substances, organic compounds of arsenic - diphenyldichlorarsine - CLARK I (DA), diphenylcyanoarsine - CLARK II (DC), adamsite (DM), diphenyldichlorarsine (DA), ethyldichlorarsine (ED), methyldichlorarsine (MD), mustard gas (H), sulphur mustard gas (HD), T-mustard gas, Q-mustard gas, nitrogen mustard gases (HN1, HN2, HN3), lewisite (L), mixed mustard gas (H-L), phosgene oxime (CX), phosgene (CG), diphosgene(DP), chloropicrin (PS), hydrogen cyanide (AC), cyanogen chloride (CK), arsine (SA), G-agents: sarin (GB), cyclosarin (GF), soman (GD), tabun (GA), IVA (GV), V-agents: VX, VR, VE, VG (amiton), VM and toxic industrial chemicals such as: fumes of organic or inorganic acids, hydroxides, organic solvents with a boiling point above 65° C, ammonia, amines, inorganic and acid gases, agricultural chemical combustion gases, other toxic substances, e.g. benzene, toluene, vinyl chloride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, sulphur oxides, chloroacetic acid, aldehydes, mixtures of inorganic acids, and organic substances, mercury vapors, radioactive iodine, organic compounds of iodine (Iodomethane, 129, 131), radioactive particles, etc.

GAS MASK FILTER LIFETIME:

Breakthrough time of a gas mask filter is tested according to EN 14387+A1 at humidity 70% and flow rate 30 l/min, which is equivalent to the volume of air per minute used by an average person carrying out medium heavy work. The approximate lifetime (usage time) of a filter may, under normal conditions, calculated by comparing the concentration at the workplace and the minimum Dynamic Adsorption Capacity (DAC) for the filter.

GAS MASK FILTER STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE:

Each NBC-77 SOF gas mask filter is sealed in a plastic bag by the manufacturer. Store the filters unopened in a clean place at even temperature, most appropriate at -5 to +30°C and relative humidity below 80%. Sealed filters tolerate also conditions of -30 to +50°C and RH below 95%. The storage period (month and year) for filters is marked on the filter label. Do not try to regenerate the filters. Never clean the filters with compressed air or compressed water.

GAS MASK FILTER DISPOSAL:

After use, gas mask filters are considered special refuse. Make sure that they are disposed of according to the filtered substance (gases or particles) in accordance with current waste treatment regulations. If the product is to be disposed of, it should be dismantled from the respirator and disposed of as solid waste. Please see local authority regulations for disposal advice and locations.

1 FILTER ONLY!

Vendor: MIRA Safety
$79.95
Maximum quantity available reached.

To simplify the various conditions New & Used items may have, we created a conditions guide:

  • New Condition: new with or without tags, various dates and manufacturers. 

  • Good Condition: shows signs of use, light fading/ possible small stains and or small factory repairs. Tags may be legible, may have name tapes and patches sewn on by previous owner. Various dates and manufacturers.

  • Fair Condition: shows signs of use, fading/ small stains/ factory repairs. Tags may be legible, may have name tapes and patches sewn on by previous owner. Various dates and manufacturers.

  • Poor Condition: shows signs of heavy use, fading/ stains/ holes/ rips/ major factory repairs. Tags may be legible, may have name tapes and patches sewn on by previous owner. Various dates and manufacturers.
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Military surplus comes in a variety of different conditions based the three " " rule: What, Where, When.

  • Depending on what the item is will generally determine the amount of use and what it was used for. This is important because some items do not endure the torture of being in the field for prolonged periods of time, while others might.
  1. Ex: Dress Uniforms are not worn in combat, therefore generally, there is lighter use than issued combat/working uniforms.

  • Knowing where the item most likely was issued/stored will generally determine the environment it was exposed to. This is important because some items are exposed to harsher conditions than others, or are straight from storage.
  1. Ex: Uniforms & Gear issued in the Vietnam War saw extreme heat and moister, giving those items specific textures/smells/common problems, while the same items issued to troops in occupied Europe do not have those attributes (Generally better conditions). 
  2. Ex: Uniforms & Gear stored in a controlled environment (warehouses or similar areas) feel and smell different than if it is stored in a non-controlled environment (Random areas/outside/or exposed to elements)

  • Time is a huge factor, when something was issued generally determines the age of the item. As time goes by everything ages, this is the circle of life and it does apply to inanimate objects, like military surplus. Items will show signs of age, typically tarnished metal/fading/stains/rips/holes/rot/smell. The exception to the rule is NOS ( New old stock) items or ones stored carefully in controlled environments.
  1. Ex: Uniforms & Gear from World War 2 are generally made of canvas/leather/twill or HBT fabric, and are close to 100 years old. These items have more than likely seen combat or were reissued in the Korean or Vietnam Wars. Extensive use and the fact that they are almost a century old will reflect the condition & price. This applies to any era. 
  2. Ex: Uniforms & Gear from the original factory box, or items stored carefully in controlled environments will generally retain their durability and "new" look. The age of an item sometimes is not a factor BUT only when it is properly stored or carefully looked after.

Any questions? Feel free to contact us!

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